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Category: Colour Inspiration

  1. Heels and Toes for Hand Knitted Socks

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    One of the delights of knitting socks is that they’re a great way to use skeins of wildly variegated yarns.

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes 1

    Most of a sock is made up of a tube that doesn’t change in width, so the colours can repeat in a pattern through the leg and the foot. If you want that pattern to continue uninterrupted then using a contrast colour for heels and toes is a great option.

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes 3

    These socks are knitted in our 4ply BFL nylon in the Dark Chocolate Tunnocks colourway with heels and toes in raspberry.

    These socks are knitted with 64 stitches in the round, so many patterns will tell you to work the short row heel over half that number. I find I get a much better fit if I add a few more stitches to the heel, so the heels in these socks are worked over 36 stitches rather than 32.

    If you’d like to give this a go here are some colour suggestions for you.

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes misty neons and yellow

    Misty neon and yellow

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes misty neons and hydrangea

    Misty neon and hydrangea

    bfl nylon sock heels and toes faded rainbow and pearl 

    Faded rainbow and pearl

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes faded rainbow and rose

    Faded rainbow and Rose

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes stormy sky and geranium

    Stormy sky and geranium

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes stormy sky and coal

    Stormy sky and black

     bfl nylon sock heels and toes 2

    The contrast in my socks was knitted with a 20 gram mini skein. Once the socks were done I wanted to check if I had enough yarn to work the ribs too. Casting on 64 stitches let me work 33 rounds of rib before I ran out of yarn. That means there’s plenty of yarn for 10 rounds of rib at the top of each sock without needing to play yarn chicken, even if you had a few more stitches on your needles.

    Happy sock knitting.

    Take me to the sock yarn.

  2. Yarn Substitution - Moonbroch Linen Stitch Cowl

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    When we added Moonbroch to our yarn range we thought it might work well as a substitute for 4ply or fingering in some patterns. That might seem a little strange as a fluffy laceweight yarn and a smooth 4ply don’t seem to have all that much in common.

    moonbroch-rainbow-mohair-silk-haze-hand-dyed-yarn-indie-uk-yorkshire

    The fluffy fuzzy halo of mohair which surrounds the silk core is the thing that makes this substitution work. That fluff helps to hold space, and that gives the fabric a gorgeous structure.

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 1

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 4

    When we knew we were adding muticolours back to the range we wanted to do something to show these off, and we turned to the Double Rainbow Linen Stitch Cowl.

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 2

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 5

    Using a multi-coloured yarn with dark, almost black sections and a black contrast yarn (BFL, silk and alpaca) allows the rainbow sections to really pop.

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 3

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 6

    This would also be stunning with a paler contrast colour – so where you see black between the bands of rainbow you’d see the black in the Moonbroch yarn.

    moonbroch Rainbow kid mohair silk linen stitch knitted cowl 7

     

    You can find this pattern in Knit The Rainbow, and it's also available as a single pattern from Ravelry.